Networking

Not meant as a complete in depth guide but certainly enough to point you in the right direction here’s my list of the most commonly seen (from my point of view) HPE Aruba (e.g. the 2540, 2930F, 5400R series) fibre optics and their respective part numbers:

The format is effectively <Speed> <Fibre Type> <Maximum Range> – <Part Code>

1Gbit Multi Mode 500m – J4858D

1Gbit Single Mode 10km – J4859D

10Gbit Multi Mode 300m – J9150D

10Gbit Single Mode 10km – J9151E

Data from: https://support.hpe.com/hpesc/public/docDisplay?docId=a00028947en_us


Today we have the answer to the question – Without SSL decryption how many threats/attempted vulnerability exploits/other bad stuff will I miss that are coming from the internet at my internally hosted (externally published) web sites and services?
To run some simple tests (which will be detected as malicious attacks) I’m going to be running the Nessus scanner against a website behind a Palo Alto Networks Next Generation Firewall, while we won’t get the same results that might be seen from a ‘determined attacker’ we will get an idea of how things look from the standpoint of a ‘casual attacker’.

In short the answer is you’ll miss a lot – without decryption of traffic coming at your own web servers it’s pretty much impossible to detect attacks (with some minor exceptions) that are hiding inside HTTPS, either way let’s see how it’s done…

Kit list for this testing:

  • An ‘internal’ web service, in this case the web console for PRTG Network Monitor (running on Windows Server)
  • A Palo Alto Networks Next Generation Firewall – a PA-850 running PAN-OS 8.1 with a full suite of licences
  • The Nessus vulnerability scanner

Both the firewall and the web service have been configured to run TLS1.2 with the private key for the certificate on both (which allows the firewall to decrypt the traffic without breaking connections) and the latest firmware/security updates have been applied across the board. Continue reading

Graylog is a brilliant (and Open Source) tool to easily capture logs from a variety of systems including good old fashioned syslog.

In the screenshot guide below you will learn how to use a set of extractors I constructed to parse out useful information from PAN NGFW syslog.

The link to the source files mentioned is: https://github.com/jamesfed/PANOSGraylogExtractor

When running CLI commands against an HPE Aruba (previously ProCurve) switch that have long outputs you have likely encountered the line below.

— MORE –, next page: Space, next line: Enter, quit: Control-C

Although handy – on occasion you might need to turn this off. To do so simply run the command (no need to be in config mode for this) below.

no page

Note that this will only turn off paging for the current session so if you log out or reboot the switch you’ll need to run the command again. Equally so to turn paging back on simply run the command below.

page