So first things first….the title of this article is misleading; thus far Avid do not seem to have released a sounds pack specific for Sibelius 8 as you will see on the website when you login in (https://my.avid.com/account/orientation) the only option is for the 7.5 sounds pack. But…this works!

Now deploying Sibelius it’s self in a silent manner is (in my opinion) pretty well documented at this link – http://avid.force.com/pkb/articles/en_US/how_to/en396971.

When you get to the sounds the documentation (again in my opinion) (which can be found here – http://avid.force.com/pkb/articles/en_US/How_To/Installing-and-using-Sibelius-Sounds-across-a-network) is flaky at best not to mention the confusion around version 7/7.5/8.

For example the install path is listed as C:\Program Files (x86)\Avid\Sibelius Sounds\Sibelius 7 Sounds, well Sibelius 8 is x64 only so do we put it in the C:\Program Files folder instead? The registry entry is listed as HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Avid\Sibelius Sounds\Sibelius 7 Sounds\ContentPath – well again do we update this to be ‘Sibelius 8 Sounds’?

Well as it transpires their guide is correct in all respects; however, as it states in the clear there is no silent install command for the sounds. Ultimately though its just a copy and paste operation with the addition of a registry key so lets use some PowerShell to get this software deployed! Continue reading

Check DCsOne of those monthly jobs that every SysAdmin will come across is good old Patch Tuesday; to help make Patch Tuesday a little more fun after all of the servers have been updated I use Hyper-V Replica (run by a PowerShell script) to shutdown each Virtual Machine and move it onto another host (ticks the box for the machine reboot component of Windows Updates and also tests our DR solution in one hit!).
However as both of my DCs are Virtual Machines I want to make sure that at least one DC is up at all times, to do that I have built a little PowerShell function (see below to download it within a zip file!) that is run before every migration to ensure that both DCs are up and running (along with the Network Policy Server service which is used to authenticate clients on the network (and so is very important!!)) before any migration happens.

Hopefully this will help someone someday!

  See if DCs are up (905 bytes, 21 hits)

A silly gotcha more than anything else…. after recently updating my WSUS server to use SSL (to allow publishing through the firewall) I noticed my clients that were deployed with MDT (Microsoft Deployment Toolkit) were not installing updates as part of the Task Sequence; indeed the message log at the end indicated that the updates could not be downloaded as there was no connectivity to the WSUS server.

Lone behold I had updated the path to be https:// (against http://) in the Group Policies that pointed the clients at the WSUS server but not in the Deployment Share properties in MDT. So let the lesson be learnt… be sure to make the URL change in MDT as well as in Group Policy.

1While working on my most recent Hyper-V Replica PowerShell script when attempting to reverse replication from a source Hyper-V host to the a target host using Certificate authentication I was getting the error message…

Hyper-V failed to establish a connection with the Replica server ‘<target hostname>’ on port ‘443’. Error: The connection with the server was terminated abnormally (0x00002EFE).

As it turns out I had recently deleted and created a new certificate for the target host and as such there was no certificate listed in Hyper-V Settings > Replication Configuration. The fix was to set the replacement certificate in the box provided. See the screenshots below for a little more…

Having recently purchased a Dell T430 tower server which we will be using for backup and Hyper-V replica I thought I’d share some photos of what the castors (an option in place of either the rack mounting kit or the floor stand feet) look like!

The castor assembly comes in a separate box to the server and only takes a minute or two to install; I perhaps was expecting slightly larger wheels however they do a good job all the same on hard floors.

The screenshot above shows a portion of the sensor in its default form; in this post I’m going to show how to…

  • Remove the red ‘downtime’ line from the bottom of the chart
  • Set maximum and minimum values of the graph to display 0 to 100%
  • Set the gauge to display its value in GByte instead of MByte

Red Downtime line

Pure aesthetics with this tweak – the memory sensor isn’t something that I would expect to ever encounter downtime (if there server were offline then the PING sensor would pause the memory sensor automatically). The only real application for the downtime sensor would be if WMI wasn’t responding.

Max and Min

PRTG will automatically set the scale for your graphs but I prefer to see the full range of 0 – 100%; this tweak makes that possible.

GByte instead of MByte

When working with servers with small amounts of RAM (lets say 4GB and less) it is typically going to work out best to view free RAM as MBytes but when working with Hyper-V hosts (48GB and 96GB in my case) GBytes are a much better value to work with.

The end result…

Its been a day or so since buying a Microsoft Band 2 (took a while to find a high street shop that had one to try on in the first place!) and its proving rather useful to me as a person who rarely has his phone turned on loud and really never notices the little vibrations from it. My most recent application of Band 2 has been using it to receive push notifications from PRTG via my Windows Phone.

In all truth if you already have push notifications setup then you are probably already getting the notifications however if you are not keep reading to find out where to check for the right settings…

On the Microsoft Health App/Band Tiles

On the PRTG App

On your PRTG Console

On your Notification Settings

WP_20151112_10_34_28_RawAs part of an ongoing project to improve the room today we’ve been installing a set of rails for a pair of Dell PowerEdge T430 servers. You may have noticed the ‘T’ in the T430 to indicate they are tower servers but Dell provides a 5U rack conversion kit which is pretty easy to install.

One small question came up while putting the rails in – ‘Where do I mount the rails in relation to the 5U of space in the rack?’ to answer that question the bottom of the rails go at the bottom of the 5Us of space. Hopefully the image to the right illustrates this better!